Defending Yourself in Criminal Matters Could Backfire

People who represent themselves at criminal trials seldom have a good outcome. While they may study the laws related to their case and think they are ready to defend against criminal charges, their lack of experience tends to backfire on them in ways they never anticipated. If you're facing criminal charges, it's important to consider the potential consequences if the prosecution can prove its case against you. With so much on the line, hiring an experienced defense attorney is the only logical thing to do.

What Is Conscious Avoidance and How Can It Land You in Jail?

In many criminal cases, especially in federal white collar prosecutions, the defense is "I didn't know what those other people were doing." This defense is in line with a basic principle of our criminal justice system -- that people are only responsible for their own actions. However, there are times when it simply doesn't work.

All About Double Jeopardy in Delayed Death Murder Cases

Murder has long been different from other crimes in that it has no statute of limitations and can be charged even when death occurs long after the criminal act. Another long-standing principle in the law is that the constitutional provision against double jeopardy means that a person can't be tried twice for the same action. What happens when these two principles collide?

Do You Need a Lawyer? How to Find an Attorney You Can Count On

Finding a good lawyer is an important part of dealing with any sort of legal problem. Whether you need a trust drawn up or a will created, the right attorney will help you get the job done as quickly and painlessly as possible. Unfortunately, many people aren't quite sure how to find a trustworthy lawyer. If you've never had to meet with someone for legal advice or counseling, chances are that you are unsure of where to start searching. No matter what type of lawyer you need, there are several ways you can be sure to get the best help possible for your personal situation.

What Are the Limits On Protective Sweeps?

When police are in a home due to consent, a warrant, or exigent circumstances, their actions are generally limited to the specific purpose for which they entered, and any searches not directly related to that purpose violate the Fourth Amendment. One exception is a protective sweep, which allows officers to check for additional people or immediately accessible weapons. However, as one federal court recently affirmed, officers may not automatically conduct a protective sweep in all circumstances.

4 Tips About Weapon Charges You need to Know

Weapons offenses generally arise in two circumstances. One is as an add-on charge to a violent crime. The second is when police search a person or their vehicle after making contact for some other reason such as during a routine traffic stop. No matter what the original circumstances were, police arresting someone on a weapons charge must have discovered the weapon through legal means.